Death in the Primrose Hotel – Chapter 8 cont’d.

I then proceeded to tell him about my conversation with Tom Forsythe. “Vanessa’s going and she’ll also be issued a concealed carry and a badge.” “I could use a Pennsylvania concealed carry,” Lyons said, then pointing to the stack of books on the desk, he asked, “Homework?” “I thought I’d do some research on Prohibition before Vanessa and I go back to the Primrose Hotel. Maybe we’ll find something that’ll be of help,” I said. Lyons reached for one of the library books, sat in one of my client chairs laid the book on his lap, sipped his coffee and thumbed through the pages. He stopped thumbing and read aloud for a minute. “In Europe and in Colonial America at the time, alcohol was far safer to drink than the water. The water had all sorts of bacteria from farm runoff, animal and human wastes. Making alcohol involved boiling water which sterilized the bacteria,” Lyons said. I Googled Prohibition and clicked on the top website on the list and read from the screen. “…That with all the plentiful and available alcohol drunkenness was rampant. Even before the Civil War, temperance groups, such as Carrie Nation, her hatchet and the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, inveighed against the uncontrolled drunkenness and wanted to ban alcohol.” “It seems that it wasn’t the alcohol the temperance people were against, but the drunkenness the alcohol caused,” Lyons said. “It seems that way,” I said. “Carrie Nation had a mentally retarded son. She blamed her alcoholic husband for her son’s mental condition. A hundred or so years later Prohibition was the law of the land.” Lyons grabbed another donut and said, “that’s like blaming the car for a accident involving a drunk driver or blaming the gun for somebody getting shot. And I thought that was a modern concept.” He went back to his book and read silently while I surfed another website.I then proceeded to tell him about my conversation with Tom Forsythe. “Vanessa’s going and she’ll also be issued a concealed carry and a badge.” “I could use a Pennsylvania concealed carry,” Lyons said, then pointing to the stack of books on the desk, he asked, “Homework?” “I thought I’d do some research on Prohibition before Vanessa and I go back to the Primrose Hotel. Maybe we’ll find something that’ll be of help,” I said. Lyons reached for one of the library books, sat in one of my client chairs laid the book on his lap, sipped his coffee and thumbed through the pages. He stopped thumbing and read aloud for a minute. “In Europe and in Colonial America at the time, alcohol was far safer to drink than the water. The water had all sorts of bacteria from farm runoff, animal and human wastes. Making alcohol involved boiling water which sterilized the bacteria,” Lyons said. I Googled Prohibition and clicked on the top website on the list and read from the screen. “…That with all the plentiful and available alcohol drunkenness was rampant. Even before the Civil War, temperance groups, such as Carrie Nation, her hatchet and the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, inveighed against the uncontrolled drunkenness and wanted to ban alcohol.” “It seems that it wasn’t the alcohol the temperance people were against, but the drunkenness the alcohol caused,” Lyons said. “It seems that way,” I said. “Carrie Nation had a mentally retarded son. She blamed her alcoholic husband for her son’s mental condition. A hundred or so years later Prohibition was the law of the land.” Lyons grabbed another donut and said, “that’s like blaming the car for a accident involving a drunk driver or blaming the gun for somebody getting shot. And I thought that was a modern concept.” He went back to his book and read silently while I surfed another website.

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